In-spired

In-spired

Recently we were out for a walk in familiar territory – along the River Tay in Perth.

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I’ve photographed the spires of these churches on many occasions, but not from this viewpoint. Generally, I’ve tried to include the river – preferably when it’s calm. This time, I decided to take advantage of the sparse foliage and shoot through the trees.

Sometimes you need to look at the familiar from a different angle – not just in photography.

 

Faith, hope and love

Faith, hope and love

When we visited Vienna this installation was displayed in Stephansdom.

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Glaube (faith) and Hoffnung (hope) are visible; Liebe (love) is at the far end. The whole piece is called Collective Heart by Eva Petric. I think it adds light and life to the cathedral. The ‘umbrellas’ are made from pieces of crochet-work. This gives a sense of being delicate, but not fragile.

 

Up on the roof

Up on the roof

Well, not literally on the roof, but on one of the towers of the Staphansdom in Vienna.

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I loved the decorative tiles that cover the roof. They turn something practical into something beautiful. I also loved the view from here. In the distance, you can see the twin white towers of the Votivkirche.

This one’s really as simple as that.

This church is brought to you by our sponsor…

This church is brought to you by our sponsor…

This church – the Votivkirche – was one of our first views in Vienna. It’s visible from several parts of the city.

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Despite that, I didn’t quite capture the essence of it. This isn’t a great photo, but I was tickled that the scaffolding seemed to be sponsored by a soft drinks firm. I wonder if that might catch on in the UK.

 

(Other, similar images can be found on my Flickr site – if you’re interested.)

A missed opportunity

A missed opportunity

This is one of those images, that doesn’t quite work. I visited the Karlskirche several times, but I wasn’t happy with any of them. this is about as good as it gets.

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I’d like to go back and give it another go – make more of the reflections and the people who gather around the edge of the water.

Sometimes you know that there’s good image there, but you just can’t see it. or is that just me?

(Other, similar images can be found on my Flickr site – if you’re interested.)

Across the Millennium Bridge #1

Across the Millennium Bridge #1

The Millennium Bridge has become a common vantage point for capturing shots of St Paul’s cathedral. And I don’t have any problems with that – I’ve certainly used this before.

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For this shot, I moved to one side of the bridge, rather than standing in the centre. I like the way that the lines of the bridge’s steelwork lead the eye towards the dome of the cathedral. I tried to get some motion blur images of the people crossing the bridge. But they weren’t ver successful and they distracted from the main purpose of the photo – i.e the cathedral. I might try some motion blur the next time I visit.

 

(Other, similar images can be found on my Flickr site – if you’re interested.)

Through the blossom

Through the blossom

As all photographer’s know, timing matters. We were in London as the cherry blossom was opening. I happened to be waiting for my wife in this vicinity. the timing worked in my favour.

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My interest was initially captured by the blossom tree itself. Then I realised that I could include the dome of St Paul’s, by moving myself a few feet to the right. I’m not entirely convinced by the execution, but I like the idea. So did another photographer, who came and stood beside me to take a similar shot. It’d be nice to see how her image turned out, but I guess I’ll never know.

(Other, similar images can be found on my Flickr site – if you’re interested.)

The camera exposed

The camera exposed

There’s a story behind this photo. (I know, there’s a story behind every photo.. but we don’t always share them!)

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This image was taken shortly after we had visited the Victoria and Albert Museum. My main purpose for going to the VandA was to see an exhibition called “The camera exposed’. This was a series of photos that all include a camera – and some including the photographer. This intrigued me.

So, when we arrived at St Paul’s – looking for somewhere to eat lunch – I spotted this mirrored surface. It was the perfect opportunity to make a connection to the idea behind the exhibition. So, lunch was slightly delayed. The green blob in the reflection is me. You might have to enlarge the photo to see the camera.

I think the raindrops add a certain je ne sais quoi to the shot. Raindrops featured again later that afternoon. But that’s a story for another time,

(Other, similar images can be found on my Flickr site – if you’re interested.)

Floodlit

Floodlit

This image combines two themes that have featured (and will continue to do so) on this blog recently – St Paul’s cathedral and twinkling lights.

(Click on image for larger version.)

This view was taken from the Southbank. I  like this angle, because of the way that the towers and the dome interact. I must visit again and get closer to the cathedral to understand how it is floodlit.

I was tempted to tone down (or remove) the bright red light in the lower left of the photo. It seemed to be a distraction from the subject (i.e. St Paul’s). But, then I thought that the shot worked because ti showed the cathedral in its context. And it would be wrong to remove part of that environment. Anyway, St Paul’s can stand up to the minor distraction of a single red light!

(Other, similar images can be found on my Flickr site – if you’re interested.)