Procession

Procession

I was in St Andrews last week, and it happened to be a day of graduation ceremonies at the University. I (consciously) didn’t have my camera with me, as I knew it would be a temptation when I had other business to attend to. Of course, I took some photos using my phone.

While I spent much of the day trying to avoid the graduating students and their families, I was glad that I was in North Street as one of the graduation processions took place.

As the procession moved around the quadrangle in ever-decreasing circles, I noticed that the colour of the academic hoods was best seen from behind. So, while most people were looking for the faces of their children/friends, I was looking away from the faces and following the procession from the back side.

A simple conversion to black and white, then layer masks to pull through the colours… and you have this image.

Taken at St. Andrews University

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See my Flickr site for similar images – if you’re interested.

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Magnolia confetti #1

Magnolia confetti #2

I wanted to emphasise the delicate pink shades of the magnolia petals. So I’ve destaurated most of the colours. I think it works quite well.

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Taken on The Strand, London.

(See my Flickr site for similar images – if you’re interested.)

As time goes by

As time goes by

Walking along The Strand (during my one lens, one hour challenge) my eye caught the frontage of the old Strand Station. I was attracted by the shades of red in the image. The contrast of the man sitting still and the pedestrians rushing past was an added bonus.

To emphasise the red, I’ve desaturated most of the other colours, giving an almost monochrome feel to the background.

Taken on The Strand, London.

(Click on image for larger version.)

See my Flickr site for similar images – if you’re interested.

London icons

London icons

Walking down Whitehall one afternoon, there were hordes of tourists gathered around the mounted guards and outside Downing Street. At one point it became difficult to get past the crowd safely. So as we waited, I turned to look the other way.

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I spotted the London Eye and then noticed that there were several buses coming towards us. I saw an opportunity and managed to capture this image. there were several other failures… but that’s photography for you.

While processing I decided to de-saturate all of the colours, except the iconic red of the bus.

Taken on Whitehall, London.

(See my Flickr site for similar images – if you’re interested.)

Working with colour (or, “Say ‘Cheese!'”)

Working with colour (or, “Say ‘Cheese!'”)

This photo was taken on the same afternoon as yesterday’s. On a grey Sunday, this cheese display stood out. I like the structure of the stall as well as the vibrancy of the colours.

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I need to develop a bit more confidence – a thicker skin and sharper elbows – for this type of photography!

(See my Flickr site for similar images – if you’re interested.)

Archway #2

Archway #2 

This is a modified version of yesterday’s entry, which might not be obvious at first sight.

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I wanted to emphasise the ‘blue-ness’, so I’ve de-saturated some of the other colours.  I think the difference is clearest in the reflections on the surrounding buildings.

(See my Flickr site for similar images – if you’re interested.)

Riesenrad – from the outside #1

Riesenrad – from the outside #1

Looking up at the Riesenrad from Prater park gives an indication of its scale. If you’re interested, you can find technical details here.

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I like the simplicity of the colours and design from this angle. I particularly like the soft forms of the trees and clouds as a contrast to the linear engineering elements.

(See my Flickr site for similar images – if you’re interested.)

Riesenrad – from the inside

Riesenrad colour – from the inside

As the Riesenrad slowly turns, you get an opportunity to move around the carriage. We were fortunate that our carriage was relatively quite – six of us in total. This meant that I could shift my attention from the panorama to the structure and back again without being too annoying (I hope).

(Click on image for larger version.)

It was inevitable that I would do a ‘pop out’ B&W conversion – how could I resist?

(See my Flickr site for similar images – if you’re interested.)