Still work to be done

Still work to be done

I didn’t have to wait too long for this bee to land on the flower head that I was focussing on. As the flowering season draws to a close, there’s lots of work for the bees to do. That’s also true for gardeners!(Click on image for larger version.)

(See my Flickr site for similar images – if you’re interested.)

 

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Japanese anemone

Japanese anemone

As the gardening year (or at least, the flowering year) draws to a close here, I’m going to post a few flower photos. This one was taken in Alnwick Garden a few weeks ago.

(Click on image for larger version.)

There’s nothing special about the processing – the flower speaks for itself.

(See my Flickr site for similar images – if you’re interested.)

Going to seed #3

Going to seed #3

In recent years, I’ve become a bit fixated on thistle down. I love the contrast between the soft seedheads and the prickly nature of the plant.

(Click on image for larger version.)

With this image, I was trying to use the grass as a frame for some of the thistle heads. It’s not exactly how I’d anticipated it, but I think it’s OK.

(See my Flickr site for similar images – if you’re interested.)

Going to seed #1

Going to seed #1

My digital friend, Leanne Cole has a weekly feature on her site called Monochrome Madness. That be an appropriate title for this week’s entries here – all (well, almost all) of the images will be black and white.

(Click on image for larger version.)

If you want to see the coloured versions of these photos, they will appear on my Flickr site (see link below).

(See my Flickr site for similar images – if you’re interested.)

Riesenrad – from the outside #1

Riesenrad – from the outside #1

Looking up at the Riesenrad from Prater park gives an indication of its scale. If you’re interested, you can find technical details here.

(Click on image for larger version.)

I like the simplicity of the colours and design from this angle. I particularly like the soft forms of the trees and clouds as a contrast to the linear engineering elements.

(See my Flickr site for similar images – if you’re interested.)