The colour red

The colour red

This photo captures two of the themes that I’ve noticed about my London pictures – Blackfriars Bridge and the colour red.

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With the number of red buses in London, it would be difficult (but interesting?) to avoid it. This photo celebrates it, bringing different shades together in one image. Processing consisted of desaturating most colours to leave the reds prominent.

As you can see, I had some problems with the verticals in this shot, but I don’t think it detracts too much.

(Other, similar images can be found on my Flickr site – if you’re interested.)

An emerging obsession

An emerging obsession

Now that our daughter lives in London, we’re visiting several times a year and becoming more familiar with parts of the city. As I’m processing my photos, I’m spotting some common themes – some of them bordering on obsession!

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The bridges at Blackfriars definitely fall into the ‘obsession’ category. I love these pillars from the old railway bridge – that have a timeless elegance that captivates me.

I’m sure that I’ll keep playing with them for a while. So, I’m open to suggestions about other angles or compositions.

(Other, similar images can be found on my Flickr site – if you’re interested.)

Millennium in motion – again – #2

Millennium in motion – again – #2

Somehow (i.e. carelessly) I managed to publish yesterday’s entry without any text. Oops!

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So, here’s the story.  I was standing on the Millenium Bridge taking some motion blur shots. I suppose I was trying to be inconspicuous, but the tripod and camera gear was a bit obvious. So much so that another photographer came to join me at this spot. He was setting up his equipment when this woman walked right in front of us to take her photo. She passed within two feet of me, then walked directly ahead.

I was trying to be inconspicuous, but the tripod and camera gear was a bit obvious. So much so that another photographer came to join me at this spot. He was setting up his equipment when this woman walked right in front of us to take her photo. She passed within two feet of me, then walked directly ahead.

Initially, I was a wee bit outraged. She knew she was blocking our view. “How selfish!”

Then I spotted the opportunity. If she was standing still, that would provide a contrast to the people who were walking along. I think the shot got even better when she raised her arm.

I’m glad that I didn’t wait until she’d cleared the view, since she provides the focal point of this image.

The processing of this version was a simple conversion to black and white, then a layer mask to pull her colour through.

 

(Other, similar images can be found on my Flickr site – if you’re interested.)

Abstract blossom #2

Abstract blossom #2

While I was attracted to this bundle of petals (as I described yesterday), it’s one of the rare occasions when I could see the post-processed image before I took the shot.

(Click on image for larger version.)

Instinctively, I thought that it would work in monochrome, with some petals picked out through a layer mask.

I like it, I’d love to know what you think.

(Other, similar images can be found on my Flickr site – if you’re interested.)

Memorial: the keys against forgetting

Memorial: the keys against forgetting

This is the last image from Vienna that I’m going to post (for a while). It’s also the image that has stayed with me since our trip last year.

(Click on image for larger version.)

This is a memorial to the Jewish victims of the Holocaust who lived and worked in the Serviten district of Vienna. It’s called the keys against forgetting (Die Schlüssel gegen Vergessen). The keys and names represent the people expelled from the area – many of them died in concentration camps.

This memorial feels very personal, almost intimate. I found it very hard hitting because you can’t escape the disruption of normality for so many people.

 

(Other, similar images can be found on my Flickr site – if you’re interested.)

Portico #2

Portico #2

The columns were the feature that caught my attention, but the mosaic behind them intrigued me. Why put it behind the columns?

(Click on image for larger version.)

Well, I don’t know the answer to that question. Nor do I know what the mosaic depicts. But I do think that it looks amazing.

So, I converted the image to black and white, used layer masks to pull through the coloured mosaic. And, suddenly, the mosaic has preeminence – although it’s still obscured!

(Other, similar images can be found on my Flickr site – if you’re interested.)

Fantasy at the opera

Fantasy at the opera

The Opera House (Staatsoper) in Vienna is a magnificent building – so it will feature here for a few entries.

(Click on image for larger version.)

The front of the building is decorated with five statues. This one, apparently, represents fantasy.

The ceiling behind the statue is brightly and richly coloured. But I felt that the wire mesh (presumably to deter birds) was very intrusive. So, I opted for a monochrome approach. But rather than converting the image to black and white, I desaturated some of the colours. This preserved the steely blue tinge of the statue, which I liked.

(Other, similar images can be found on my Flickr site – if you’re interested.)