Calm and intense

Calm and intense

On a recent walk to the harbour in Irvine, I was struck by the symmetry of this boat’s reflection. As I looked more closely, I noticed the intense blue of the water.  And, given that it was a slightly frosty yet sunny day, Arran was clearly visible in the background.

It presented a wonderful opportunity.

Taken at Irvine harbour, Ayrshire, Scotland.

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See my Flickr site for similar images – if you’re interested.

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Through the ladder #2

Through the ladder #2

This simple black and white conversion of yesterday’s image somehow seems to sharpen the image. I don’t know why. But I like it.

Taken at St Monans harbour, Fife, Scotland.

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See my Flickr site for similar images – if you’re interested.

Through the ladder #1

Through the ladder #1

This is probably the most unusual perspecitve in this mini-series. As I was climbing up the ladder, I spotted the view of ‘The Blocks’ through the top rung of the ladder. I haven’t seen this shot before, but if you know differently, let me know.

Taken at St Monans harbour, Fife, Scotland.

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See my Flickr site for similar images – if you’re interested.

From the ladder

From the ladder

Continuing the theme of slightly different perspectives, this shot of “The Blocks” was taken while standing on the ladder that takes you up (and over) the harbour wall.

This seemed like a good vantage point… until I decided to change lenses. Then it became a wee bit precarious.

A smarter person would have gone back to ground level for the changeover, but where’s the sport in that?

Taken at St Monans harbour, Fife, Scotland.

(Click on image for larger version.)

See my Flickr site for similar images – if you’re interested.

Jagged rocks

Jagged rocks

One of the features around St Monans harbour is the variety of rock formations. This set of rocks look like a monstrous array of sharp teeth. It was fun to sit and watch the waves crashing into them.

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While I like the colour version of this image (see Flickr), I feel that the B&W choice has a more dramatic feeling.

Taken at St Monans, Fife.

(See my Flickr site for similar images – if you’re interested.)

Zigzag breakwater

Zigzag breakwater

St Monans has a very interesting breakwater – to protect the harbour. It’s formed in a zigzag shape. To get a clear view of it, you need to climb an iron ladder and look from the top of the harbour wall. It’s known locally as ‘The Blocks’ – presumably because of the way that it has been constructed.

(Click on image for larger version.)

From this angle, you get an idea of how ‘The Blocks’ protect the harbour mouth (which is at the extreme left of the picture).

Taken at St Monans harbour.

(See my Flickr site for similar images – if you’re interested.)

Risk assessment

Risk assessment

On a recent trip to St Monans, I took a walk around the harbour area. It was a lovely day, but there were a few sizeable waves around.

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I wanted to capture the effect of the waves crashing into the harbour wall. So, I set myself up where I had a good backdrop and waited for the waves to come. Quite a few waves came and went without creating any real interest. Then this one came and I was doubly fortunate – I clicked the shutter at the right time and I managed to stay dry (although it was a close thing)!

Taken at St Monans harbour.

(See my Flickr site for similar images – if you’re interested.)

Irvine sunrise #3

Irvine sunrise #3

Nae man can tether time or tide.

Robert Burns

This quotation (from Tam O’Shanter) is carved into some steps at Irvine beach. As it’s Burns Day, it seemed apt.

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As I was taking these photos, I was trying to anticipate when the waves would break – aiming to capture that moment when the water rises, curls and prepares to drop again. I didn’t succeed in this endeavour… at all.

But I did come up with this shot. I like the way that the rising sun is reflected in the relatively calm water between the waves. And I like the breaking waves in the background too. Sometimes accidents make the best images.

(See my Flickr site for similar images – if you’re interested.)