Tower Bridge #1

Tower Bridge #1

Earlier this week I posted a photo taken while walking across Tower Bridge.

I’ve tended to view the Bridge from the banks of the Thames (and once from the Shard). These more traditional views let you see the bridge as a whole.

(Click on image for larger version.)

But shooting from a different angle allowed me to frame the tower in a different way – using one of the arches of the bridge itself.

Seeking alternative perspectives really does make a difference in photography – and other aspects of life.

(Other, similar images can be found on my Flickr site – if you’re interested.)

HMS Belfast @ sunset

HMS Belfast @ sunset

I really liked the background to this photo – the way the lights was catching the Post Office Tower.

(Click on image for larger version.)

However, I had a lot of trouble processing it. I had used my neutral density filter to cope with shooting towards the strong, low sunlight. This created a silhouette effect throughout the image, including HMS Belfast in the foreground.

So I’ve fiddled with some fill light in the RAW editor and some of the light settings in Photoshop. The end product is close to what I was hoping for… but not quite there yet. I’d like the background to be a bit more silhouette-y.

Any suggestions?

The glass floor

The glass floor

I took this shot while walking across Tower Bridge. I was looking up to see if I could spot the (relatively) new glass floor that has been installed. If you click on the image to enlarge it, you can see it more clearly.

(Click on image for larger version.)

I can’t decide if this photo is a by-product of my curiosity or not. Is the unusual perspective accidental or deliberate? I can’t be sure, and it doesn’t really matter to me.

 

(Other, similar images can be found on my Flickr site – if you’re interested.)

Towering reflections

Towering reflections

My initial interest here was the contrast of ancient and modern – The Tower of London and the Shard.

(Click on image for larger version.)

But… when I got home and started to process this image, I realised that the setting sun had caused some reflections on the Tower’s walls. Looking at it more closely, it dawned on me that they were reflections from passing vehicles, including a double-decker bus.

It’s not the best photo that I’ve ever taken, but it does show that sometimes you don’t see what’s there until you take the time to look properly/reflectively.

(Other, similar images can be found on my Flickr site – if you’re interested.)

Millennium in motion – again – #2

Millennium in motion – again – #2

Somehow (i.e. carelessly) I managed to publish yesterday’s entry without any text. Oops!

(Click on image for larger version.)

So, here’s the story.  I was standing on the Millenium Bridge taking some motion blur shots. I suppose I was trying to be inconspicuous, but the tripod and camera gear was a bit obvious. So much so that another photographer came to join me at this spot. He was setting up his equipment when this woman walked right in front of us to take her photo. She passed within two feet of me, then walked directly ahead.

I was trying to be inconspicuous, but the tripod and camera gear was a bit obvious. So much so that another photographer came to join me at this spot. He was setting up his equipment when this woman walked right in front of us to take her photo. She passed within two feet of me, then walked directly ahead.

Initially, I was a wee bit outraged. She knew she was blocking our view. “How selfish!”

Then I spotted the opportunity. If she was standing still, that would provide a contrast to the people who were walking along. I think the shot got even better when she raised her arm.

I’m glad that I didn’t wait until she’d cleared the view, since she provides the focal point of this image.

The processing of this version was a simple conversion to black and white, then a layer mask to pull her colour through.

 

(Other, similar images can be found on my Flickr site – if you’re interested.)

Millennium in motion

Millennium in motion

For this shoot, I set out with a specific mission in mind – to capture some motion blur images on the Millennium Bridge.

(Click on image for larger version.)

It’s fair to say that there was a discard error rate. I used a neutral density filter and experimented with length of exposure. This one was 1/4 second at f11.

I’m not sure about it. How much movement is too much?

 

(Other, similar images can be found on my Flickr site – if you’re interested.)