Friday photo: Irvine harbour

Friday photo: Irvine harbour

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Taken at Irvine, Ayrshire

(See my Flickr site for similar images – if you’re interested.)

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Guiding

Guiding

As I was composing this shot, I wanted to capture the waves coming over the breakwater. You can see this in the middle of the picture.

Before I zoomed in, I noticed the brightness of the buoys in the foreground and the gull perching on the post.

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Then I realised that the theme was really about guiding. The breakwater provides protection to the harbour mouth (guiding vessels in); the buoys provide guidance to something specific (in this case, possibly berths for boats); and, I think,  the non-descript rusting posts clarify the location of the slipway, which is out of shot on the right.

Taken at St Monans, Fife.

(See my Flickr site for similar images – if you’re interested.)

Harbour

Harbour

I was intrigued by the number of boats that have been lifted from the water and lined up on the pier. I have no idea why. So, if anyone knows, please let me know.

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Although I like the coloured version of this shot (which has a brilliant blue sky), I think that the B&W version provides better contrast.

Taken at St Monans, Fife

(See my Flickr site for similar images – if you’re interested.)

Place of work

Place of work

It’s tempting to look at the harbours of the East Neuk as picturesque locations. But, they are also places where people are working hard to earn a living. So, it’s worth looking at these sites through a different lens.

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My eye was caught by the bright buoyancy aids on the lobster creels. I liked the fact that some of these are re-used containers, particularly in times when we’re trying to eliminate single use plastic because of the impact on the seas. This is a great example of recycling in action.

Taken at St Monans, Fife.

(See my Flickr site for similar images – if you’re interested.)

Zigzag breakwater

Zigzag breakwater

St Monans has a very interesting breakwater – to protect the harbour. It’s formed in a zigzag shape. To get a clear view of it, you need to climb an iron ladder and look from the top of the harbour wall. It’s known locally as ‘The Blocks’ – presumably because of the way that it has been constructed.

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From this angle, you get an idea of how ‘The Blocks’ protect the harbour mouth (which is at the extreme left of the picture).

Taken at St Monans harbour.

(See my Flickr site for similar images – if you’re interested.)

Blue harbour #1

Blue harbour #1

This is (probably) my favourite view in Seahouses. The harbour sits at the bottom of a fairly steep road. So, at the top of the road, you get a great view of the comings and goings.

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As this vessel approached the harbour, I realised how blue the scene was – the sea, the sky and the boat. So I tracked its progress, waiting for the moment that it entered the harbour mouth.

I did this for a few others, but the colour of this boat made this picture stand out for me.

(See my Flickr site for similar images – if you’re interested.)

Harbour stumps #2

Harbour stumps #2

This version of yesterday’s shot is based on the original coloured image. I’ve applied a heavy sepia filter, to create an almost monochrome effect.

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I like the way that the filter retains some of the colours of the sea, while creating a darker atmosphere. On balance, I think I prefer this version, but there’s not much in it.

(See my Flickr site for similar images – if you’re interested.)

Harbour stumps #1

Harbour stumps #1

These stumps in Irvine fascinate me. What was there original purpose?

They sit outside the mouth of the harbour, so I wonder if they originally served larger vessels that were unable to berth in the inner port. Or were they simply used as an overflow when the harbour was busy?

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This is a simple conversion to black and white. Maybe it’s a bit nostalgic, but what’s wrong with that?

(See my Flickr site for similar images – if you’re interested.)