Overhead #2

Overhead #2

So, what do you do when you have a perfect backdrop for your image?

Naturally, you change it. I decided to remove all of the blue by de-saturating it. I think it provides an interesting variation.

But I still prefer the full-colour version.

Taken at Lady Mary’s Walk, Crieff, Scotland.

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Overhead #1

Overhead #1

As well as looking back, I try to remember to look up. On this occasion I was rewarded with a wonderful sky blue background. This provided the perfect backdrop to the leaves as they were changing colour. Simply beautiful.

Taken at Lady Mary’s Walk, Crieff, Scotland.

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… going through changes

… going through changes

These leaves caught my eye because they seemed to represent various stages of transition from one branch. The range of colours seems to represent the whole cycle of change – from the vibrant green of summer through to the decaying brown of autumn.

Taken at Viewlands Park, Perth, Scotland.

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Backlit

Backlit

I have a bit of a ‘thing’ for backlit leaves (and flowers). I love the softness of the light, the vibrancy of the colours and the playfulness of the shadows.

Filled with wonder.

Taken at Viewlands Park, Perth, Scotland (aka ‘the Rezzie’ – spelling a bit dubious!)

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More blueberry

More blueberry

While taking the photo that appeared here yesterday, I noticed this pile of fallen blueberry leaves. I was struck by the intensity of their colour and the pattern on the back of the leaf.

The leaves have nestled amongst the conifer needles that we use as a mulch for the bushes. It’s a good way to recycle our Christmas tree every year, which improves the acidity of the soil. Judging by the amount and quality of fruit they produce, the plants seem to enjoy it.

Taken in our garden, Perth, Scotland.

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Don’t forget the leaves #2

Don’t forget the leaves #2

A simple ‘conversion and pull through’ emphasises the colours I was talking about yesterday.

… and as I was processing this image, I noticed that the stems have turned a reddish-purple colour. Wow!

Taken in our garden, Perth, Scotland.

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Don’t forget the leaves #1

Don’t forget the leaves #1

When my attention was drawn to the hydrangea flowers, I also started to notice how the leaves were changing. I assumed (and seem to remember) that they turn brown and are unremarkable.

However, closer inspection shows that this year, they are adopting shades of bruising.

I’m fascinated. What else have I overlooked in a garden that I think I know thoroughly? What is before my eyes, but outwith my sight?

Taken in our garden, Perth, Scotland.

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Fading

Fading

In a corner of Greyfriars Cemetery, there is a tree/shrub growing against a wall. The thing that intrigued me about it is that the leaves are losing their colour as autumn progresses.

Normally, I associate autumn with colours being intensified. These leaves are drained of colour until they become creamy white, with no ‘veining’.

I’d like to go back soon to see how it looks when this process is completed.

By the way, if anyone knows what this plant is called, I’d love to know.

Taken at Greyfriars Cemetery, Perth.

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Decay

Decay

It may not be obvious at first sight, but this week’s theme is autumn.

Walking through Greyfriars Cemetery I was attracted to this particular headstone by the way it was sitting at an angle and by the way that the fallen leaves were gathering around it.

However, I wasn’t too keen on the coloured version – it didn’t capture the atmosphere that I was looking for. Converting it to black and white and adding a sepia tone seemed to work much better.

Taken at Greyfriars Cemetery, Perth.

(Click on image for larger version.)

See my Flickr site for similar images – if you’re interested.