Archway

Archway

I really like these arches that we stumbled on in South Molton Street in London. They’re a bit different, and definitely eye-catching.

(Click on image for larger version.)

They were also popular with tourists and photographers, so I had to wait a couple of minutes to make sure that no-one was standing in front of me. But developing patience is part of the craft of photography.

(See my Flickr site for similar images – if you’re interested.)

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A traditional view

A traditional view

A more traditional Christmas view than yesterday’s entry. This was taken outside the Natural History Museum in London.

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We were heading to lunch as we passed by. So, this falls into the category of snapshot. With more time and care, I’d have tried to capture some of the motion and to avoid the lighting pillar in the front right!

(See my Flickr site for similar images – if you’re interested.)

The reflecting pool

The reflecting pool

Did I find it? Or, was I looking for it?

After the recent batch of photos from Loch Faskally, I was intrigued by the reflection of this tree at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London. I love the tranquillity of this spot and the reflection of the red bricks. The tree was a wee bonus.

(Click on image for larger version.)

No fancy processing with this one.

(See my Flickr site for similar images – if you’re interested.)

Jubilee Bridge setting 

Jubilee Bridge setting

This shot was taken from the Victoria Embankment. I wanted to capture the Palace of Westminster as a backdrop to the Jubilee Bridge.

(Click on image for larger version.)

As I was processing this one, I realised that desaturating all of the blue and cyan would emphasise the golden-ness of Westminster.

With a bit more perseverance, I might have found an angle that would have framed the tower better – maybe next time!

(Other, similar images can be found on my Flickr site – if you’re interested.)

Jubilee Bridge detail

Jubilee Bridge detail

Walking across the Jubilee Bridge on a gloriously sunny evening, I was struck by the patterns of the structure.  The wires seem to be set at unconventional angles – I’m sure there must be a technical engineering term for this.

Anyway, as well as looking ahead, I took the time to look up. This seemed to create a range of images that highlighted the complexity of the structure.

(Click on image for larger version.)

To compensate for the bright sunlight – especially when looking upwards – I used a neutral density filter. Beyond that, this is a simple conversion in Photoshop Elements. The black and white option seems to draw attention to the clouds, as well as the bridge structure.

(Other, similar images can be found on my Flickr site – if you’re interested.)

The Scoop

The Scoop

Strolling and discovering… a lovely way to spend time. This ‘find’ came as we were having a post-dinner walk along the Thames.

(Click on image for larger version.)

I subsequently discovered that the Scoop is used as an amphitheatre, so we’ll need to visit again at a different time to see what’s happening. I’d also like to invest some time looking at different angles and perspectives – I think it offers lots of opportunities.

(Other, similar images can be found on my Flickr site – if you’re interested.)

You’ve been framed! #1

You’ve been framed! #1

Another opportunist shot. Heading back to our hotel, looking towards the Shard, I noticed how the flags seemed to be forming a frame for the view.

(Click on image for larger version.)

I also liked the contrasting heights of the mast, funnel, Shard, Tate Modern and the modern apartments. (The empty space to the left is intentional.)

I wonder what the semaphore means!

(Other, similar images can be found on my Flickr site – if you’re interested.)

Ominous sky

Ominous sky

This photo was taken on a warm afternoon in May. The build up of clouds happened quickly. A brief, intense downpour followed shortly after we noticed the ominous signs. As soon as I’d taken this shot we headed swiftly back to our hotel.

(Click on image for larger version.)

There isn’t a lot of processing with this image – I did adjust the light a bit and straightened the horizon. But that’s all. In this case, the picture really does tell the story.

(Other, similar images can be found on my Flickr site – if you’re interested.)

View from (beneath) a bridge

View from (beneath) a bridge

On an early morning stroll, I came across this scene. I liked the way that the shimmer from the river was reflected in the underside of the Bridge.

(Click on image for larger version.)

If you look closely, there’s also a reflection on the railings. Somehow, this worked better in black and white – in my opinion.

(Other, similar images can be found on my Flickr site – if you’re interested.)