Schönbrunn’s gardens #2

Schönbrunn’s gardens #2

Today’s ‘alternative treatment’ is a favourite of mine – the black & white conversion, then pull through some colour.

(Click on image for larger version.)

This one was a bit intricate and took a lot longer than I’d intended. But, I think it was worth the effort.

(See my Flickr site for similar images – if you’re interested.)

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Schönbrunn’s gardens #1

Schönbrunn’s gardens #1

Earlier this week I posted some patriotic flowers from Schönbrunn’s gardens. Toady I thought I’d show you the big picture. Although it’s not my cup of tea, it’s quite an impressive front garden.

(Click on image for larger version.)

I found my way behind the fountains to try to get a sense of size and layout of the flower beds. We were there quite early, so there weren’t many people wandering around. Ninety minutes later, it was pretty crowded.

Lesson – the early photographer gets the shot.

(See my Flickr site for similar images – if you’re interested.)

Patriotic flowers

Patriotic flowers

Usually, I have a strong aversion to ‘municipal bedding’ in gardens.

Unusually, I was impressed by the formal gardens at Schönbrunn Palace. I liked the use of the Austrian flag colours and design in these beds. The curve of the beds gives the impression of a flag flowing in the breeze.

(Click on image for larger version.)

To emphasise the colours in this bed, I converted the image to B&W, then ‘popped out’ the red and white. Obviously, the white of the flowers was tinged with cream/yellow and the green foliage came through as well.

(See my Flickr site for similar images – if you’re interested.)

Schönbrunn’s ruin

Schönbrunn’s ruin

While in Vienna this year we visited Schönbrunn palace. more accurately, we visited the grounds of the palace. The main objective was to see – and photograph the Gloriette. I was disappointed with my photos of the Gloriette. They were OK, but there was no feeling in them. They were – at best – tourist snaps.

However, I was fascinated by this Roman ruin. It seemed ironic to me that the Habsburg dynasty would commission this piece to reflect the fall of another empire. (In this case, the Roman conquest of Carthage.)

(Click on image for larger version.)

I think this is a picture that tells a story – of pride coming before a fall; of over-confidence; of lack of insight and self-awareness. Maybe that applies to all of us, not just to imperial dynasties.

(See my Flickr site for similar images – if you’re interested.)