Design features

Design features

I’ve shown these images of Blackfriars Bridge to highlight the clever design of the underpass. I like the way that the pedestrian route under the road bridge picks up the red arcs from the bridge’s design.

(Click on images for larger versions.)

The lighting in the underpass was a wee bit tricky. But it was a beautiful sunny morning, and I did a bit of manipulation in RAW and Photoshop to lighten it a bit.

 

(Other, similar images can be found on my Flickr site – if you’re interested.)

The colour red

The colour red

This photo captures two of the themes that I’ve noticed about my London pictures – Blackfriars Bridge and the colour red.

(Click on image for larger version.)

With the number of red buses in London, it would be difficult (but interesting?) to avoid it. This photo celebrates it, bringing different shades together in one image. Processing consisted of desaturating most colours to leave the reds prominent.

As you can see, I had some problems with the verticals in this shot, but I don’t think it detracts too much.

(Other, similar images can be found on my Flickr site – if you’re interested.)

An emerging obsession

An emerging obsession

Now that our daughter lives in London, we’re visiting several times a year and becoming more familiar with parts of the city. As I’m processing my photos, I’m spotting some common themes – some of them bordering on obsession!

(Click on image for larger version.)

The bridges at Blackfriars definitely fall into the ‘obsession’ category. I love these pillars from the old railway bridge – that have a timeless elegance that captivates me.

I’m sure that I’ll keep playing with them for a while. So, I’m open to suggestions about other angles or compositions.

(Other, similar images can be found on my Flickr site – if you’re interested.)

The glass floor

The glass floor

I took this shot while walking across Tower Bridge. I was looking up to see if I could spot the (relatively) new glass floor that has been installed. If you click on the image to enlarge it, you can see it more clearly.

(Click on image for larger version.)

I can’t decide if this photo is a by-product of my curiosity or not. Is the unusual perspective accidental or deliberate? I can’t be sure, and it doesn’t really matter to me.

 

(Other, similar images can be found on my Flickr site – if you’re interested.)

Towering reflections

Towering reflections

My initial interest here was the contrast of ancient and modern – The Tower of London and the Shard.

(Click on image for larger version.)

But… when I got home and started to process this image, I realised that the setting sun had caused some reflections on the Tower’s walls. Looking at it more closely, it dawned on me that they were reflections from passing vehicles, including a double-decker bus.

It’s not the best photo that I’ve ever taken, but it does show that sometimes you don’t see what’s there until you take the time to look properly/reflectively.

(Other, similar images can be found on my Flickr site – if you’re interested.)

In-spired

In-spired

Recently we were out for a walk in familiar territory – along the River Tay in Perth.

(Click on image for larger version.)

I’ve photographed the spires of these churches on many occasions, but not from this viewpoint. Generally, I’ve tried to include the river – preferably when it’s calm. This time, I decided to take advantage of the sparse foliage and shoot through the trees.

Sometimes you need to look at the familiar from a different angle – not just in photography.

 

Portico #2

Portico #2

The columns were the feature that caught my attention, but the mosaic behind them intrigued me. Why put it behind the columns?

(Click on image for larger version.)

Well, I don’t know the answer to that question. Nor do I know what the mosaic depicts. But I do think that it looks amazing.

So, I converted the image to black and white, used layer masks to pull through the coloured mosaic. And, suddenly, the mosaic has preeminence – although it’s still obscured!

(Other, similar images can be found on my Flickr site – if you’re interested.)

Portico #1

Portico #1

The portico to the Austrian Parliament features columns that wouldn’t be out of character in a Greek temple.

(Click on image for larger version.)

I was intrigued by the way that they were lit, so I wandered up to take a look at some of the details. The lighting creates some interesting shadows and contrasts – although the verticals were very challenging. It’s maybe not an obvious photo to show from the Parlament, but it would be wrong to overlook the details.

 

(Other, similar images can be found on my Flickr site – if you’re interested.)

Parlament at night

Parlament at night

I find it fascinating to see how different a building can look (and feel) at night.

(Click on image for larger version.)

The Austrian Parliament is equally impressive by day or by night. But I think there is a feeling of warmth when it’s floodlit. Maybe the edges are a bit softer, or the lighting brings out a mellower aspect to the stonework. Or, perhaps, it simply brings back a pleasing memory.

 

(Other, similar images can be found on my Flickr site – if you’re interested.)

Parlament

Parlament

The Austrian Parliament building is stunning. It conveys a sense of open-ness that is quite unusual in the modern age.

(Click on image for larger version.)

The Greek style of the architecture fits well with the imperial tone in many parts of Vienna. But, most of all, it’s just an attractive building.

This panorama was taken with my iPhone.

 

(Other, similar images can be found on my Flickr site – if you’re interested.)