Flow

Flow

This dam of rocks had created a still pool, with the water only flowing from one side. The addition of the fallen leaves caught my attention.

(Click on image for larger version.)

I used a neutral density (ND) filter to slow the shutter speed and create the motion blur effect.

(See my Flickr site for similar images – if you’re interested.)

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Millennium in motion – again – #2

Millennium in motion – again – #2

Somehow (i.e. carelessly) I managed to publish yesterday’s entry without any text. Oops!

(Click on image for larger version.)

So, here’s the story.  I was standing on the Millenium Bridge taking some motion blur shots. I suppose I was trying to be inconspicuous, but the tripod and camera gear was a bit obvious. So much so that another photographer came to join me at this spot. He was setting up his equipment when this woman walked right in front of us to take her photo. She passed within two feet of me, then walked directly ahead.

I was trying to be inconspicuous, but the tripod and camera gear was a bit obvious. So much so that another photographer came to join me at this spot. He was setting up his equipment when this woman walked right in front of us to take her photo. She passed within two feet of me, then walked directly ahead.

Initially, I was a wee bit outraged. She knew she was blocking our view. “How selfish!”

Then I spotted the opportunity. If she was standing still, that would provide a contrast to the people who were walking along. I think the shot got even better when she raised her arm.

I’m glad that I didn’t wait until she’d cleared the view, since she provides the focal point of this image.

The processing of this version was a simple conversion to black and white, then a layer mask to pull her colour through.

 

(Other, similar images can be found on my Flickr site – if you’re interested.)

Millennium in motion

Millennium in motion

For this shoot, I set out with a specific mission in mind – to capture some motion blur images on the Millennium Bridge.

(Click on image for larger version.)

It’s fair to say that there was a discard error rate. I used a neutral density filter and experimented with length of exposure. This one was 1/4 second at f11.

I’m not sure about it. How much movement is too much?

 

(Other, similar images can be found on my Flickr site – if you’re interested.)

Speeding from the scene

Speeding from the scene

(Click on image for larger version.)

I had absolutely no intention of including vehicles in this photo. In fact, as I was shooting this scene, I was trying to use the traffic lights (which were to the right), to give me a clear view. Obviously, this driver was in a hurry to get somewhere. Or, his/her reactions were sharper than mine! Anyway, it was a happy accident, because I like the effect of the motion blur.

Pity about the vertical lines of the building. But to fix then would have meant losing the car, which would have been an exercise in futility.

(Other, similar images can be found on my Flickr site – if you’re interested.)

Tower Bridge

Tower Bridge

On our second (evening) visit to the Shard, I came up with a strategy to compensate for the ‘no tripod’ rule. I placed my camera on the floor; knelt down; and pressed the lens hood against the glass. It wasn’t perfect, but I got a couple of decent shots with this approach.

(Click on image for larger version.)

There’s nothing unique or creative about this composition, but I am pleased with the blurred motion of the vehicles on the bridge. (You’ll get a better view by enlarging the image.)

I also like the shimmering reflection in the river, which was ‘kinda intentional’.

 

Southbank in motion 2

Southbank in motion 2

The motion blur in this photo is not intentional. I was trying to capture the curving line of lampposts with St Paul’s cathedral in the background. The length of exposure (1.6 seconds) created the blur. The starburst from the light is straight out of the camera, and I’m very happy with that!

(Click on image for larger version.)

Other night time shots along the River Thames are available on Flickr.

Southbank in motion

Southbank in motion

Continuing the theme of motion blur that emerged on our recent visit to London…

This one is taken on the Southbank at approximately 8 p.m. There were plenty of people around to create movement and energy. I used a five second exposure, so I’m grateful to the people to the right of the image for sitting still!

(Click on image for larger version.)

I seem to be going through a monochrome phase in my post processing preferences. If you want to see the colour or the simple black and white versions, check out my Flickr page.

 

Motion in the market

We visited Borough Market on a Saturday afternoon. It’s fair (and obvious) to say that it was very busy. I noticed that there was an interesting mixture of people standing looking at the stalls and produce, while others were trying to make their way quickly through the market. This stall grabbed my attention because of the meat products hanging from the roof. The movement was accidental, but I think it captures some of the atmosphere.

(Motion blur was a bit of a theme for this visit to London!)

If you’re interested, the shutter speed was 1/20, aperture = 7.1.

I also converted this shot to black and white. I can’t decide if it enhances the shot or not. What do you think?

Museum in motion

I’m taking a wee break from processing posting photos from our trip to Vienna, to work on some recent material from a trip to London. The images below were taken in the Victoria and Albert museum. I was sitting on a bench in a (relatively) quiet corridor when I noticed that people were tending to move around in groups. So, I thought I’d dabble in some motion blur shots. Rather than set up my tripod, I placed my camera on the bench beside me. My intention was to avoid drawing attention to myself, so that people would move naturally rather than becoming self-conscious.

Later, I tried to take some similar images of the entrance vestibule. There’s room for improvement, so I’ll keep working on this technique.

(Click on images for larger versions.)