An Eye for detail

An Eye for detail

This shot was intended to capture half of the London Eye. I wanted to look at the structure without any other contextual information. I was fascinated by the criss-crossing cables (and I liked the background of clouds).

(Click on image for larger version.)

But when I look at the photo now, my eye is drawn to the people in the pods. And now that I’ve mentioned that, what do you see?

(Other, similar images can be found on my Flickr site – if you’re interested.)

Tower Bridge #1

Tower Bridge #1

Earlier this week I posted a photo taken while walking across Tower Bridge.

I’ve tended to view the Bridge from the banks of the Thames (and once from the Shard). These more traditional views let you see the bridge as a whole.

(Click on image for larger version.)

But shooting from a different angle allowed me to frame the tower in a different way – using one of the arches of the bridge itself.

Seeking alternative perspectives really does make a difference in photography – and other aspects of life.

(Other, similar images can be found on my Flickr site – if you’re interested.)

Juxtaposition

Juxtaposition

Yesterday’s entry about the peace garden was focussed on the garden. Today’s focus is on the backdrop. From the angle of this photo, you see both the pillar leading to the Peace Garden and the giant guns at the front of the Imperial War Museum. It highlights some of the tensions in our world.

(Click on image for larger version.)

The pillar contains a message from the Dalai Lama, which includes these words:

“We human beings are passing through a crucial period in our development.

Conflicts and mistrust have plagued the past century, which has brought immeasurable human suffering and environmental destruction. It is in the interests of all of us on this planet that we make a joint effort to turn the next century into an era of peace and harmony.

May this peace garden become a monument to the courage of the Tibetan people and their commitment to peace.

May it remain as a symbol to remind us that human survival depends on living in harmony and always choosing the path of non-violence in resolving our differences.”

If only…

(Other, similar images can be found on my Flickr site – if you’re interested.)

Peace Garden

Peace Garden

I was delighted to stumble across the Peace Garden at the Imperial War Museum in London. I hadn’t noticed it previously, and only came across it because we approached the museum from a different direction. There’s a wee photography lesson in that… about considering different angles and perspectives.

(Click on image for larger version.)

The garden is a wonderful combination of planting and structure in perfect harmony. Just like a garden should be.

(Other, similar images can be found on my Flickr site – if you’re interested.)

In-spired

In-spired

Recently we were out for a walk in familiar territory – along the River Tay in Perth.

(Click on image for larger version.)

I’ve photographed the spires of these churches on many occasions, but not from this viewpoint. Generally, I’ve tried to include the river – preferably when it’s calm. This time, I decided to take advantage of the sparse foliage and shoot through the trees.

Sometimes you need to look at the familiar from a different angle – not just in photography.

 

Tower Bridge

Tower Bridge

On our second (evening) visit to the Shard, I came up with a strategy to compensate for the ‘no tripod’ rule. I placed my camera on the floor; knelt down; and pressed the lens hood against the glass. It wasn’t perfect, but I got a couple of decent shots with this approach.

(Click on image for larger version.)

There’s nothing unique or creative about this composition, but I am pleased with the blurred motion of the vehicles on the bridge. (You’ll get a better view by enlarging the image.)

I also like the shimmering reflection in the river, which was ‘kinda intentional’.

 

On the right tracks

On the right tracks

One of the great things about the view from The Shard is the different perspective that it offers. I really liked the way that the curves and connections of the railway track were so evident.

(Click on image for larger version.)

While I like that there are two trains visible, I wish I’d been able to capture some motion blur. But the Shard’s ‘no tripod’ had me a bit flummoxed. Oh well, I still like it.

St. Paul’s from the Shard #1

St. Paul’s from the Shard #1

This photo was taken from the viewing platform of the Shard. I’ll be posting a few more taken from there soon. The views from it are stunning and it’s a great experience. However, it’s not the best place for photography. Firstly, it’s generally busy, so you’ll need to dodge around people. More pertinently, you have to shoot through glass. There are two viewing levels – both are completely surrounded by glass. Suffice to say, I had an extremely high ‘reject rate’ for my shots.

But, as I said, it’s a great experience. We bought a ticket that allowed us to visit twice in the same day – we went at 1000 and 1800. The evening slot allowed us to enjoy the views as the sun set and darkness settled in. This was my favourite experience.

In addition, you are not allowed to use tripods, which makes night time shots tricky. For some shots, I overcame this restriction simply by placing my camera on the floor. This image is an example of that. I love the way that the cathedral stands out in an elegant, almost understated way. It’s a lovely building, and it will feature here for several days!