St Monans Windmill #2

St Monans Windmill #2

Given that I took this photo mainly because of the blue sky, why would I convert it to black & white?

(Click on image for larger version.)

Well, the short answer is: to see how it would look.

And… I like how it turned out. Maybe the shadows are a bit more prominent, maybe the windmill is more dominant. Either way, I think it’s an improvement (which I’m a bit surprised about).

Taken at St Monans, Fife

(See my Flickr site for similar images – if you’re interested.)

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St Monans Windmill #1

St Monans Windmill #1

Looking at the windmill from this side (as opposed to Thursday’s entry), there is not a cloud to be seen. I thought the sky was truly awesome.

(Click on image for larger version.)

So, I allowed plenty of ’empty space’ in the frame to capture the brilliant blue.

Taken at St Monans, Fife.

(See my Flickr site for similar images – if you’re interested.)

Salt pans’ windmill

Salt pans’ windmill

This windmill is on the path from St Monans to Pittenweem. Originally, it was used to pump water for the salt pans in this area.

(Click on image for larger version.)

My interest was in its architecture and, specifically, how it looked against the brilliant blue sky.

Taken at St Monans, Fife.

(See my Flickr site for similar images – if you’re interested.)

Guiding

Guiding

As I was composing this shot, I wanted to capture the waves coming over the breakwater. You can see this in the middle of the picture.

Before I zoomed in, I noticed the brightness of the buoys in the foreground and the gull perching on the post.

(Click on image for larger version.)

Then I realised that the theme was really about guiding. The breakwater provides protection to the harbour mouth (guiding vessels in); the buoys provide guidance to something specific (in this case, possibly berths for boats); and, I think,  the non-descript rusting posts clarify the location of the slipway, which is out of shot on the right.

Taken at St Monans, Fife.

(See my Flickr site for similar images – if you’re interested.)

Harbour

Harbour

I was intrigued by the number of boats that have been lifted from the water and lined up on the pier. I have no idea why. So, if anyone knows, please let me know.

(Click on image for larger version.)

Although I like the coloured version of this shot (which has a brilliant blue sky), I think that the B&W version provides better contrast.

Taken at St Monans, Fife

(See my Flickr site for similar images – if you’re interested.)

Place of work

Place of work

It’s tempting to look at the harbours of the East Neuk as picturesque locations. But, they are also places where people are working hard to earn a living. So, it’s worth looking at these sites through a different lens.

(Click on image for larger version.)

My eye was caught by the bright buoyancy aids on the lobster creels. I liked the fact that some of these are re-used containers, particularly in times when we’re trying to eliminate single use plastic because of the impact on the seas. This is a great example of recycling in action.

Taken at St Monans, Fife.

(See my Flickr site for similar images – if you’re interested.)

Pantiles and gable-ends #2 

Pantiles and gable-ends #2

What to do with this image?

Of course –  de-saturate to leave the ‘pantile’ colours. (I’m pretty sure they’re not all pantiles, but I’m a photographer, not an architect.) The inclusion of some of the buoys is a wee bonus.

(Click on image for larger version.)

Taken at St Monans, Fife

(See my Flickr site for similar images – if you’re interested.)

Pantiles and gable-ends #1

Pantiles and gable-ends #1

Visiting St Monans when the sky was stunningly blue, I couldn’t resist taking a panorama of the ‘front’. From the east pier you get a wonderful view.

(Click on image for larger version.)

The iPhone seems like the perfect tool for this job. You get a better view by clicking through to the larger image.

Taken at St Monans, Fife.

(See my Flickr site for similar images – if you’re interested.)

Jagged rocks

Jagged rocks

One of the features around St Monans harbour is the variety of rock formations. This set of rocks look like a monstrous array of sharp teeth. It was fun to sit and watch the waves crashing into them.

(Click on image for larger version.)

While I like the colour version of this image (see Flickr), I feel that the B&W choice has a more dramatic feeling.

Taken at St Monans, Fife.

(See my Flickr site for similar images – if you’re interested.)